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Environmental Woes of Tierra del Fuego -- Invasive Species

Hunter Juan Rivero displays one of hundreds of pelts he claims to have waiting for market. In 1998, the Argentine provincial government bought 1,100 Canadian-designed traps to loan to ranchers, hunters, researchers and the national park. They provided training for prospective hunters on trap use and preparation of the pelts. The hunting season was extended to the full year in hopes of inspiring the locals to trap the animals and sell the furs according to the 1946 plan. But economics and world politics create more problems for the Fuegian dream of beaver control. "There's no demand for furs," says Nora Loekemeyer of the provincial natural resources office in Ushuaia. "The price is only $10, and they can't be exported to the EU."

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© Kevin Moloney, 2000
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Hunter Juan Rivero displays one of hundreds of pelts he claims to have waiting for market. In 1998, the Argentine provincial government bought 1,100 Canadian-designed traps to loan to ranchers, hunters, researchers and the national park. They provided training for prospective hunters on trap use and preparation of the pelts. The hunting season was extended to the full year in hopes of inspiring the locals to trap the animals and sell the furs according to the 1946 plan. But economics and world politics create more problems for the Fuegian dream of beaver control. "There's no demand for furs," says Nora Loekemeyer of the provincial natural resources office in Ushuaia. "The price is only $10, and they can't be exported to the EU."