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Araújo examines a bone drill found among the thousands of mussel shells at the site of a Yamaná settlement last occupied 800 years ago. During the period that the excavation site was occupied, Piana notes, the Yamaná population was very high, 20
to 40 times the density of other hunter-gatherer tribes across the Strait of Magellan in continental Patagonia. Despite their high population, the Yamaná couldn't destroy their food supply, Piana says. Seal rookeries are hundreds of miles south in Antarctica, and only far-ranging adults could be caught by the canoe-bound Indians. They could not overhunt.

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© Kevin Moloney, 2001
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Araújo examines a bone drill found among the thousands of mussel shells at the site of a Yamaná settlement last occupied 800 years ago. During the period that the excavation site was occupied, Piana notes, the Yamaná population was very high, 20<br />
to 40 times the density of other hunter-gatherer tribes across the Strait of Magellan in continental Patagonia. Despite their high population, the Yamaná couldn't destroy their food supply, Piana says. Seal rookeries are hundreds of miles south in Antarctica, and only far-ranging adults could be caught by the canoe-bound Indians. They could not overhunt.