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Environmental Woes of Tierra del Fuego -- Ozone Depletion

Ultraviolet filters made of mylar sheets and chicken wire surround branches of an evergreen beech tree Matt Robson examines. Open to allow as close to normal air flow, insect access and motion as possible, the filters reduce a branch's exposure to the higher levels of ultraviolet radiation that strike the earth when the ozone hole passes above. Branches react to UV exposure independently, allowing researchers to compare filtered and unfiltered branches on the same tree. In filtered plots that receive the same levels of ultraviolet as pre-ozone hole days, the evergreen species of beech seems to be growing healthier leaves that appear to attract hungry caterpillars more than the unfiltered branches.

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Filename
07BranchFilter.jpg
Copyright
© Kevin Moloney, 2000
Image Size
4605x3054 / 3.9MB
Ultraviolet filters made of mylar sheets and chicken wire surround branches of an evergreen beech tree Matt Robson examines. Open to allow as close to normal air flow, insect access and motion as possible, the filters reduce a branch's exposure to the higher levels of ultraviolet radiation that strike the earth when the ozone hole passes above. Branches react to UV exposure independently, allowing researchers to compare filtered and unfiltered branches on the same tree. In filtered plots that receive the same levels of ultraviolet as pre-ozone hole days, the evergreen species of beech seems to be growing healthier leaves that appear to attract hungry caterpillars more than the unfiltered branches.